The Baby Bump and Malignant Lump: A Case Report of a Pregnant Patient with Pelvic Sarcoma

Original Article | Volume 6 | Issue 2 | JBST May-August 2020 | Page 25-27 | Daniela Kristina D. Carolino, Mary Rose C. Gonzales, Richard S. Rotor. DOI: 10.13107/jbst.2020.v06.i02.28

Author: Daniela Kristina D. Carolino[1], Mary Rose C. Gonzales[1], Richard S. Rotor[2]

[1]Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, St. Luke’s Medical Center, Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines.
[2]Department of Musculoskeletal tumors, Institute of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, St. Luke’s Medical Center, Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines.

Address of Correspondence
Dr. Daniela Kristina D. Carolino, 279 E. Rodriguez Sr. Ave, Quezon City 1112 Metro Manila.
E-mail: dkdcarolino@gmail.com


Abstract

Purpose: The occurrence of a malignancy during the course of pregnancy is uncommon but devastating. Due to the relative rarity of the condition, guidelines for management are largely based on small retrospective studies or case series with limited follow-up. With this case, we aim to discuss the options of management and rationalize the decisions, in which the course of treatment of this patient has proceeded.
Materials and Methods: We describe the clinical presentation of the patient as well as the radiological findings, diagnostic tests, and management during the course of the disease.
Results: A 26-year-old (gravida 2, para 1) Filipino female presented initially with a limp and gradual enlargement of a mass on the right hip while with a single intrauterine pregnancy of 8–9 weeks age of gestation. As the growth the mass continued, the patient sought consult at our institution at 22 weeks gestation and was presented with options for management. The patient opted for conservative treatment with chemotherapy over hemipelvectomy. The neonate was eventually delivered at 35 weeks of gestation and the demise of the patient ensued 2 months postpartum.
Conclusion: The treatment of malignancy in the pregnant patient should be individualized and largely dependent on the decision of the mother, once full disclosure of all options of management, possible risks, and prognosis has been discussed.

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How to Cite this article: Carolino DKD, Gonzales MRC, Rotor RS | The Baby Bump and Malignant Lump: A Case Report of a Pregnant Patient with Pelvic Sarcoma | Journal of  Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors | May-August 2020; 6(2): 25-27.

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